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the equipment works and is accurate. -- -- and the car was not moving for 30 seconds. host: new york city is accused of rigging red lights in a class-action lawsuit. new york city is facing a class action lawsuit. the city accused of rigging lights to catch more drivers and right more tickets. -- write more tickets. isidor is a republican in washington, d.c. caller: in d.c. on new york avenue, as you entered the scene, they have the camera right there. if you are headed into maryland or coming into d.c., they have the gotcha camera. there are police on duty right after you run the red light camera to slow you down and give you a ticket even if you got the red-light ticket. what about the drug drivers? they're really not that concerned. it is a money machine. they're all over. host: do you think it makes use a for? caller: no. i'm not saying they could use speed bumps, and i don't think it makes us safer. if anything, i've seen it cause a lot of accidents, people slamming on breaks. host: story from the washington post. our question for you this morning is what you think of red-light camer
in the past. grow up. host: jim is in bay city, michigan. republican. good morning. caller: good morning. i want to talk about this gas prices at four dollars per gallon. we have a president that all he talks about is solar and wind mills and stuff like that. it is ridiculous. we have oil up to our ears hear in this country, and environmentalists are the only thing stopping refineries and anything that makes it all. i wish they would go back to their caves where they belong. host: from "wall street journal," "florida governor supports broader medicaid," saying he wants the state to expand medicaid under the federal health law, taking him the seventh gop governor to back expansion of medicaid, along with michigan governor rick snyder and ohio governor john kasich. mr. scott said that he supports a three-year expansion as long as the federal government agrees to keep its commitment to pay 100% of the cost during this time. he called a compassionate, commonsense step forward. president obama's original 2010 health law called for the us to pay 100% of the cost for three years." that is in "wall
in the city in ohio and if i did not have a public pension i think that would have been working for the rest of my life. an earlier caller mentioned pensions being affected, but when this crisis happened, you had to have some faith in the economic system. when you look at what happened during the depression, we came out of it. i figured at that time that the country would eventually come out of it. where would we have been five years later? nowhere. i have a tendency to side with the republicans, but at the same time i still think that some of those protections were warranted for people. into the system you get so many people on fox news, knocking down public pensions. the average person in ohio makes about $26,000 per year. all of that talk about locking down those pensions is just bad, really bad, they should stop it. host: what is your pension look like? tell us about it. caller: it is not a bad tension. they did change this, it has changed. you are able to retire at 55, but they changed it to 57. you need 25 years in the system to do that. most people will go for 30 years in ohio. i am a
to happen, rather than arbitrary cuts. host: a lot more stories about your largest city, detroit, and its economic issues. what is the future of that city? guest: detroit has many great things going on, young people moving in, some great projects going on. the challenge in detroit is city government. it is not a recent issue. there are good people in the recent administration. this goes back for decades. the city government is unsustainable in terms of its finances. it needs to provide better services. we have had a review team looking at the finances. one of the question it asks is, do we need to take additional steps to get detroit's finances together? oddly partner with the city to get that happening? detroit will be a great city again. caller: what is happening in detroit is disgraceful. you run for office. you get in, you get that power, and all good ideas run out of your mind. it seems like all of the government, including state, is bought and sold to the highest bidder. you start off with a decent salary, and then when you all come out of office, your millionaires. who pays? it is
these decisions? guest: a lot of states have moved since 2007. a lot of cities have minimum wages that are a lot higher, often because the cost of living is a lot higher. states have acted unilaterally. they have looked at their industries and they have worked to do it to help low-income families. raising the minimum wage is mostly helping low-income families. teens, seniors, and others. host: the states with the lowest minimum wage, alabama, mississippi, tennessee -- they have no minimum wage. wyoming and georgia, $5.15. what do you make of those states? some southern states have no minimum wage. guest: i think the thing to remember is that those tend to be low-cost states to live in. that is probably part of this. they also tend to be states with high unemployment rates. generally, they tend to be more conservative. the politics of this is not easy. republicans have tended to resist minimum wage hikes and democrats have. the policy tends to get a bit complicated. host: what do of economists say that are for increasing the minimum wage? guest: economists say you're raising the minimum wage abou
-span.org. michael is our last call. salt lake city. democrat. caller: what is a drone? i think people have some sort of misconception about it. it is a remotely highly vehicle, controlled by humans. not much different than if you had an f-16 flying over circling around. more than likely there is somebody on the ground identifying the target. somehow they have to identify the target before they make a strike. so, the either have somebody on the ground or electronic intelligence to find that out. also, like killing bin laden -- they could have used a drug to do that. what is the difference? they still killed him. i think people have a misconception about how remotely piloted vehicle -- what it is, what the function is. and if you -- on the secrecy part -- if you release the information about who you are killing and how you got the information and where they are, the more you release that kind of information, the more our intelligence services suffer. because they are no longer a bird -- able to function in secret. because if you let everything out, it is no longer a secret. it is self defeating. so, a
street and wall street. but the divide between the city and the rest of the country is at least as bad, and it seems to get worse every year. host: from january of last -- of last year, the president in his state of the union address. some of the same themes it will continue this week. -- will continue this week. you're looking at a live at view of capitol hill. what is america's number one priority? there is this on twitter -- another issue that will be facing congress this month and next month, sequestration. it is on the front page of the l.a. times. the piece points out for richard simmons -- simons -- simon -- this morning, bill kristol has this editorial -- that is from the weekly standard. study joins us from south carolina. . -- debbie joins us from south carolina. caller: i was just listening to the illegal immigration debate going on right before this. we need to do something for illegal immigrants. the parents we send back, the kids we leave here. i cannot have a child in south carolina and say, i'm going to take her to another state. second of all, the other thing that conc
. host: you cannot find a minimum wage job? caller: jobs in my city are very hard to come by unless you know exactly where to look. i have three scholarships. i'm trying to get a job on campus to help pay my debt. jobs are in very high demand. it is difficult. i am trying. hopefully, with the president's new policies, this could be more of an easy process. host: what is the minimum wage in oregon? caller: it was recently raised by our governor to $8.95. i cannot be certain about that. i've only read one article. host: i know there are websites out there that look at the minimum wage across the states. here's the new york times -- different economic arguments for minimum-wage, something that surely will be debated in the days after last night's state of the union address. on twitter -- let's go to brian in maryland, democrat. caller: good morning. president obama's speech was refreshing. as a proud member of the u.s. armed services that served our country more than 20 years, but we are focusing on domestic agendas and trying to invest money right here in the united. united so that was ve
, and massachusetts, and cities including new york, philadelphia, and portland, or try to advance measures that would make a sixth time a legal requirement for most firms. in congress, senator tom harkin plans to reintroduce a federal paid sick leave bill this spring. some employers contend the measure has harmed workers with company wage and increase -- which by prompting cuts in wages or increases. we are asking you about the federal government and if there should be a federal mandate when it comes to paid sick days. here is how you can reach out to us, on our phone lines, all with 8202 area code. -- all with a 202 area code. you can tweet us @cspanwj and you can always send us a facebook comment. "the wall street journal" included a graphic breaking down how sick week -- how sick leave works for workers. 75% of full-time workers, 23% of part-time workers. it also brings a dumb but business sizes. for those 500 or more, 80% of the workers get paid sick leave. 66% for 100 to four hundred 99. if you have 99 or fewer employees, only 52% saying they get paid time off. senator opted -- senator harkin wr
to that in the papers this morning. on twitter -- andrew in salt lake city, utah, independent. caller: my thoughts are the same thing. it is unconstitutional. people don't want this. it is a power grab from people in love with their new powers they have found, whether it obama or bush, they both did the same king. so it's not a left or right discussion. obama and bush both did the same thing. there should be a trial to determine guilt or innocence. host: what about the overall program, the proponents saying allows us to it go in with less casualty's and take out people who have already attacked the u.s. are planning to attack the united states? caller: it always comes down to who is deciding whether they are planning it or not. in the new act, they can target americans. they can come up with their own trials and make up their own judge, yes, this guy is guilty, and this guy is in a random country. it does not justify anything. it's not cleaner than war. all. wars-- all these wars are unjustified. i think we got them back after 9/11 with 500,000 iraqis dead. host: independent caller there. now to l
and our villages and our cities across this country are all full -- are all full. i would love to have president obama interact more and let's stop having suspensions. they say we will not deal with the budget crisis now. we will wait until march to handle things. that is not the way that we can handle this country right now. all american taxpayers are having our own fiscal cliff problems and that cannot be no more. our taxes are going up, our property taxes and food taxes and any kind of hikes of taxes is a challenge for the american workers. host: thanks for your call. guest: i think the sentiment that obama should roll up his sleeves and get to work with congress is one that many members of congress actually would agree with including democrats. he has a little reputation of not reaching out to and interacting with members of congress and a way that hurts his agenda on the hill. at the same time, one chamber has not done a budget for four years and that is the senate and they decided politically it does not make sense and now they have changed that and they will do it. host: what ab
of the inner cities, the towns. i live in a well-known mennonite area, and they are coming up here. why? pennsylvania welcomes them with open arms, will not turn them in to immigration, and i will tell you one thing -- it will lead to either a race war or a revolution. host: mark, we got your point. let's get your response from deepak bhargava. guest: that call illustrates that there are deep anxieties about immigration and the changing face of america. in a few short years this will be a color nation. part of the republican stance is shaped by the election results were an overwhelming number of latinos voted for the president. there clearly is no path for a political party that is not willing to speak to the needs and concerns of the entire population. the anxiety that you see, we see younger americans much more supportive of a path to citizenship, older americans less willing to see that happen -- this is part and parcel of the change we are going through as a country. the president's point, that we cannot think of this as them against us is critical. we are all american, this is part
these proclamations, i am turning the south over to the republican party." the city just agreed with the emancipation proclamation. this is in 2013. lyndon johnson fought for all americans. i was debating whether it should be johnson or jimmy carter. jimmy carter, in the final history of this country is written, jimmy carter will be among the best up there, not ronald reagan. look what jimmy carter did, by holding to signing treaties with panama, he gave the panama canal back to the panamanians. george bush's father arrested noriega and put him in jail. thank you. host: the washington post editorial page weighs in on the question -- who gets the washington post this morning on past presidents. iowa, democratic caller, lisa. caller: good morning. president roosevelt. he was the first president i can rememberhcane helped elderly people who did not have anything. i think he started social security. he had a disability, but it did not stop him from being the best president we ever had and never will. host: what would your parents etc. this question? >> they would've said the same thing if they were alive
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13